Securing the U.S. vital infrastructure

Securing the U.S.’ vital assets is not all that difficult. Simply don’t make our vital infrastructure accessible from the Internet. The problem is that there is great political pressure to locate just about all computer systems on the Internet. The U.S. government needs to push back on this, and do what is in the best interest of Americans.

Patmore Douglas 1/8/2017 10:21:00 AM

Some people ask, how can the U.S.’ vital infrastructure (such as power plants, water supplies, traffic control systems, etc.) be guarded from hacking? The answer is to make them inaccessible from the Internet. Place these resources on private networks, just like the U.S. government places classified materials on private networks, inaccessible from the Internet. Require that if a person wants to gain control of e.g. a power plant, he has to physically go to the power plant, or maybe optionally go to one of a small number of special terminals, that have a gauntlet of security measures, which include a set of triggers, to quickly shut down manipulation of the power plant remotely, under suspicion of hacking.

The biggest obstacle to securing the U.S.’ vital infrastructure is actually political. Just about all the top computer companies have a vested commercial, and I believe ideological, interest in placing all computer systems on the Internet. Companies like Google, Amazon, and Microsoft make a huge amount of money from Internet based services, and believe in the Internet public cloud computing model over private networks, and therefore push the government and industry towards this direction, even though it leads to a host of security issues. I believe there is also an ideological bent, because all of these companies are very political behind the scenes, push the globalist agenda, and engage in collusion with tech and mainstream media, and probably among themselves. Whether it is purposeful or not, the public cloud computing model allows top computing companies to gain ever greater knowledge and control over citizens’ lives – in the U.S. and across the world. Also, most tech companies accept this computing model, because of the current sheer momentum it has in the market place.

I believe when the U.S. government looks to secure the U.S.’ vital infrastructure, it should seek out and prioritize advice from security companies, and companies who believe in the efficacy of private networks.




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